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domenica 28 maggio 2017

CHILD PORN ADDICTION 8

A pervert who accessed over 1,000 images of young children being seriously sexually abused has been jailed for two years.
Simon Cook, 41, was told by a judge that his offending was too serious to impose anything other than an immediate prison sentence

Leeds Crown Court heard Cook initially came to the attention of police in May 2014 after receiving intelligence that abusive child images had been accessed from internet address linked to his partner. An officer went to his family home on Parkside Row, Beeston, but no action was taken after he was satisfied that Cook’s partner had no knowledge of any illegal activity. Further action was taken in December 2014 when a detective inspector reviewed the matter and questioned the officer’s initial decision not to take action. Dave Mackay, prosecuting, said three laptop computers were seized from the property which were analysed and found to contain 1,192 indecent images and 57 movies. A total of 121 images and nine movies were at category A - the most serious level of offending. It was also discovered that Cook had made internet searches referring to the rape of children.

The night before his arrest he had accessed 21 different web pages featuring sexual abuse of children before doing some online gambling then visiting a casino in Leeds in the early hours of the morning. Cook initially denied ever searching for or accessing child pornography. He later pleaded guilty to four offences of making indecent images of a child. The offending took place between January 2013 and December 2014.

Holly Betke, mitigating, said Cook accepted that he accessed the images for his own sexual gratification. She said Cook had been assessed as suitable to attend a sex offender treatment programme as part of a community order. Jailing Cook, judge James Spencer, QC, said: “This case is serious because for a protracted period you sought and downloaded images of children being seriously sexually assaulted. “The fact that you and others like you provide a market for such material is the reason why such material exists. “You are responsible for this abuse of children. It seems to me that this is one of those cases which is too serious to deal with by way of any community order.

“There must be a period of imprisonment here.”



A Scott County man has been charged with 100 counts of child pornography possession after a cyber crimes investigation, according to the office of Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear.
Chad Arron Rickman, 44, of Georgetown was arrested on Friday after a team of investigators searched his home. Several electronic devices were seized from his home and employer, according to Beshear’s office.
“Shielding Kentucky’s children from online predators and sexual abuse is one of my top priorities,” Beshear said in a news release Monday. “I appreciate the investigators in my office for their hard work, KSP for their assistance and the Scott County Commonwealth’s Attorney for prosecuting this case to secure justice.”
Rickman is scheduled to appear in Scott County District Court on Tuesday.

Scott County man charged with 100 counts of child-porn possession MORGAN EADS MAY 15, 2017

ST. TAMMANY PARISH, LA (WVUE) -
A Slidell man pleaded guilty to 500 counts of child pornography on May 16.
St. Tammany Parish District Attorney Warren Montgomery reports that Lanier D. Lively, 74, will be sentenced July 3.
The Louisiana Attorney General’s Office and State Police started investigating Lively last year after police found out that a computer tracked to Lively was downloading child pornography. When officers arrived to serve a search warrant at Lively’s home, they say he was in the process of downloading a series of child pornography videos. The videos included images of infant and toddler girls being raped by adult men

The District Attorney says Lively admitted to police that he had been collecting child pornography for years.
Lively faces 10 to 40 years in prison on each count. He’ll be sentenced by District Judge Raymond Childress. 

Slidell man guilty of downloading images of infants being raped by men May 23rd 2017 FOX8Live.com Staff


Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/news/local/crime/article150566472.html#storylink=cpy
A loner who spent four hours a day viewing pornography collected hundreds of pictures and videos of child sex abuse, a court heard.
Jack Merrell posed as 40-year-old American as he attempted to trade sexually explicit pictures with children.
In fact most of the people who traded pictures with him were paedophiles, Bristol Crown Court was told as he was sentenced for a total of 17 charges relating to indecent pictures.
Merrell, of Maywood Crescent, Fishponds, pleaded guilty to three charges of distributing indecent images via a website, messaging service and e-mail.
The 22-year-old also admitted three charges relating to indecent images found on three of his computers, seven charges of attempting to cause a child to watch sexual activity and four charges of attempting to incite a child into engaging in sexual activity.

Bristol Crown Court heard Merrell had been viewing porn from the age of 12, until he watched it four hours daily.
Authorities in the USA detected his child abuse trading activities and Bristol police knocked on his door.
Michael Hall, prosecuting, said Merrell sent out a naked photo of a man in his 40s who was sexually aroused.
Although he asked for sexually explicit images in return from what he thought were children, his requests were frequently denied.
He was found to have 394 child abuse images and 135 child abuse videos.
Sarah Regan, defending, said her client had been addicted to porn from the age of 12 and was immature and socially isolated.
Judge Mark Horton handed him a two year jail term, suspended for two years.
He told Merrell: “The damage pornographic material of this kind is that it amounts to watching criminal activity being perpetrated in ghastly circumstances.

“People in dark rooms, looking at a screen, with sound more often than not.
The victims live in the knowledge that, for ever, those films and pictures of their abuse will be out there being enjoyed by some other, depraved individual, reminding them how they’ve been damaged and how their lives have been ruined.
Merrell was put on a sex offender programme for two years and told to register as a sex offender for ten years.
He was handed a ten-year Sexual Offences Prevention Order prohibiting unchecked internet use.
The Island's police say the case of a man sentenced to jail for possessing indecent images of children was the largest scale enquiry of its type undertaken by the Isle of Man Constabulary.

Martin Andrew Cleator from Douglas was found to have in excess of 900,000 indecent still and moving images of children on his computer.

The Manx force worked with the National Crime Agency to investigate and detect the offences.

Cleator was sentenced to two years in prison.

Officers say they will continue to target such offenders regardless of the scale.



David Rothenberg, 48, formerly of Margate, is serving 17 1/2 years in federal prison for possession of child pornography. The ex-lawyer was recently sent to the Broward County jail system to face separate state charges he sexually abused an underage girl in Broward County. (Handout / Broward Sheriff's Office)
When a Broward lawyer was convicted of possessing more than 1,000 child pornography photos and videos, which he viewed at home and at his law firm, he was sentenced to 17 ½ years in federal prison.
But earlier this month, in a growing trend, a federal judge in Fort Lauderdale also ordered David Rothenberg to pay a total of $142,600 in restitution to nine of the children who appeared in the disturbing digital images. Much of the material involved torture and extreme violence.
Though Rothenberg never met any of those nine victims, more and more judges are issuing rulings that recognize that he – and others like him – still caused them a significant amount of continuing harm.
Rothenberg, and other criminals who download child pornography via secretive online networks, are all links in “these complicated and sordid chains of exploitation,” Senior U.S. District Judge William Zloch wrote in his restitution order in the Rothenberg case.




In the despicable world of child pornography, research shows the internet has dramatically increased the number of criminals who sexually abuse children, sometimes in particularly violent ways, then trade or share video and photographs of the exploitation online – and on-demand – with other people who derive pleasure from viewing it.
Experts say most of the harm the children suffer is caused by the person, most commonly a family member or so-called friend, who sexually abused them and created a permanent record of it.
But victims of these kinds of crimes say the abuse continues – even after the main perpetrator is caught – because they can’t stop other people from viewing what happened over and over again.
One of the victims, who uses the pseudonym Vicky to try to protect her identity, is owed $9,000 for the one image that Rothenberg possessed of her.
I live every day with the horrible knowledge that many people are watching the most terrifying moments of my life and taking grotesque pleasure in them … Unlike other forms of exploitation, this one is never-ending,” Vicky wrote in court records.
Vicky was sexually abused by a relative from the time she was 5 years old until she was 13, according to court and other records. When she was 17, she found out that images of her being abused had been widely shared online.
She describes the difference between the damage done to her by the initial abuser and the damage done by the people who download and view the pornographic images of her as the “difference between a contained, cancerous tumor and one that has metastasized and is spreading.”
Her distress grew after she learned that the explicit photographs of her are some of the most widely traded in the world.
“This was followed by men who had seen the pornographic images of her actually seeking her out in person and on social media,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Anita White wrote in court records.
Someone actually tracked down a more recent non-explicit photo of Vicky from Facebook and created a video that featured that photo and images of her abuse, which was also shared online, court records show.
Some victims report that they have been recognized in public by people who viewed pornographic images of them online. Most need medical treatment and ongoing therapy to help them overcome the psychological damage that was inflicted on them. Many say they suffer severe stress and panic attacks when someone looks at them for a little too long in public because they fear that the stranger has seen them online and may want to harm them.
“A lot of people are under the impression that these are just pictures,” said Carol Hepburn, a Seattle attorney who represents Vicky and other victims of child pornography. “They don’t understand that these are crime scene photos – and videos – that show children being raped and crying out in pain, that are being circulated again and again and again for other people’s sexual gratification.
Every time law enforcement catches anyone who creates, distributes or possesses child pornography, investigators seize every video and photograph and send them to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in Alexandria, Va. Each image is analyzed and compared to databases of known victims and images of unknown victims are reviewed for clues that might lead to the victims and their abusers being identified.
Victims, or their attorneys, can request to be notified every time their images are discovered in the possession of a new offender and can request restitution from each person who is convicted. But there are so many copies of the photos and videos that it’s impossible to stop them from being shared online.
“I think the ages of the victims in child pornography cases are getting younger and younger, especially since I first started working in this field over 14 years ago,” said James T. Lewis, the FBI agent who supervises the agency’s Child Exploitation Task Force in South Florida. “With young people having smart phones at an earlier age, it makes them more vulnerable to sexual predators. These predators also seem to using advanced technology and social media apps to hide and trade their collections child pornography.
Lewis said his agents try to focus on people who produce child pornography, people who trade large volumes of illegal images and offenders who hold positions of authority and trust.
Experts who evaluate the harm victims have suffered use mathematical formulas to try to calculate the anticipated cost of their counseling, the mental and emotional setbacks they suffer, the loss of future earnings and the other effects of the ongoing damage.
The victims have a great need for therapy just to enable them to get up in the morning and leave the house,” Hepburn said. “Many of them have physical and psychological injuries and suffer a lifelong loss of income.”
The numbers involved in Vicky’s case are astounding.
At least 660 defendants, including Rothenberg, have been convicted of possessing pornographic images of Vicky that they either downloaded online or obtained from other criminals, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.
And more than 800 restitution orders – totaling more than $850,000 – have been issued by judges who ruled that Vicky is owed compensation. The average amount of those financial judgments was approximately $1,280, according to court records.
But Vicky’s attorney, Hepburn said those restitution orders don’t amount to anything like a payday for the victims.
Hepburn said she represents about a dozen victims. The youngest client was 2 years old at the time of the abuse and is now 8 and her oldest client is in her 30s and was abused when she was a child, Hepburn said.
Hepburn and James Marsh, a New York attorney who also represents child pornography victims, said the actual collection rate for the victims they represent is about 10 percent of what they are owed. That’s partly because many of the offenders are serving lengthy prison terms and have little or no assets and it can be complicated to try to collect the debts.
“A court could order $10 billion in restitution from a homeless defendant and the victim would never see a dime,” Marsh said. Records show that less than one-third of federal child pornography convicts were ordered to pay restitution, he said.
Victims’ advocates support proposed legislation, which has stalled, that would establish a minimum amount of damages for different levels of child pornography offenses, make enforcement more uniform, and simplify the whole process for victims.
Critics say the process is arbitrary and punishes some offenders, who are less culpable, more than they deserve because the issue is a hot-button one.
More judges nationwide are ordering offenders to pay restitution in these cases and the amounts of restitution awarded are also increasing. Justice Department statistics show that more than $10.6 million worth of fines and restitution were ordered last year, compared to $7.5 million in 2015 and $5.4 million in 2014. The number of people convicted of child pornography offenses remained steady, with slightly more than 1,900 convictions in each of the three years.
In Judge Zloch’s order in the Rothenberg case, he wrote that he followed a 2014 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that left it to each judge’s individual discretion to try to evaluate the relative level of responsibility that each defendant bore for the ongoing damage to the victim.
The judge ordered Rothenberg to pay amounts ranging from $3,000 to $42,600 to each of the nine identified victims.
There is no evidence that Rothenberg, 48, formerly of Margate, shared any of these particular images with other people, according to court records. He was arrested, pleaded guilty and sentenced last year in the federal child pornography case.
Rothenberg, who has been disbarred, is still facing separate state charges that he sexually abused an underage girl in Broward County. If convicted of those offenses, he could face life in prison and any punishment imposed would have to be served after his 17 ½ years in federal prison.

There's no consensus on whether offenders who commit sex crimes against children can be rehabilitated...

"Shocked" and "scared."

That's how former cop and preschool teacher Jesse Ward described his reaction to stumbling across a child sexual abuse image for the first time in an online network. But instead of repelling him, the image – depicting graphic and violent sexual acts committed on young victims – sent him looking for more.

“I went back to it for multiple reasons. One was because of the taboo nature of the images themselves,” Ward wrote in a letter to The Times. “There was a ‘rush’ of being involved in that world, knowing I shouldn’t.”

There's no consensus on whether offenders who commit sex crimes against children can be rehabilitated. Some psychologists and correctional workers point to low rates of re-offending for those who complete treatment programs, while others point to the high rates of re-victimization for those who don’t.

We’re talking about images and videos that are so disturbing that I’ve had to turn them off before I got sick,” said Louisiana State Police Detective Melissa Welch. “And these are individuals who are watching these videos and becoming sexually aroused and masturbating to them. So therein lies your problem with child pornography.”


Susan Tucker, an assistant warden with the Louisiana Department of Corrections who works with the state's sex offender treatment program, said sex offenders can change – or at least restrain – their behavior if given the tools and if they want to change.

“While we’ve thrown out the idea of curing a sex offender, there is a way to teach them to manage their risk,” Tucker said. “I think it’s important for people to know there are some programs that do work.”

Research has yielded conflicting results about who views child pornography, with one clear conclusion – you can’t stuff sex offenders into a neat box.

Studies of people convicted of possessing child pornography by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children and the National Juvenile Online Victimization Study found:

97 percent are male.
91 percent are white.
87 percent had no known prior arrest for a sex offense against a child.
73 percent were employed full-time.
59 percent were married or had been married.
46 percent had direct access to children through their jobs, activities or at home.
42 percent had children.
27 percent made at least $50,000 a year.

A study from the scholarly journal Child Abuse & Neglect painted a darker picture. It described those who commit sex offenses against children as having:

A history of sexual or physical abuse.
Harsh discipline and family dysfunction as a child.
Aggression, violence, antisocial behavior or addiction as an adult.
Problems with adult intimacy and a lack of social skills.

In the past five years, Louisiana offenders convicted on child pornography and sex crimes against children have included repeat sex offenders. They’ve also included foster parentsdeputiesbailiffsteacherspriestspolice officers and mayors, according to a Times review of more than 200 cases.

The reasons this heterogeneous group keeps returning to child sexual abuse images also vary.

According to the NJOV study, some – like Ward – view images for the “thrill” of doing something they know they shouldn't or of entering the dark web, a portion of the public internet that requires special software and authorization to use.

Ward, who is serving time at Louisiana’s Oakdale Federal Correctional Institution until 2025, wrote that he experienced a similar “rush” from the images as he did from being a police officer, firefighter and medic.

“I was sickened by a lot of what I saw, yet drawn to other aspects of it,” he wrote to The Times. “That push/pull kept me coming back to try and understand why I was interested in this stuff at all.”

Ward said addiction and ease of access also contributed to his involvement with the dark web.


“The fact that it was so easy to get these images was a hindrance to me getting away from it,” he wrote.  “Every time I’d delete all my images out of hate for myself, I could always re-acquire it in a few minutes online.”

People arrested for possessing child pornography cited other reasons for wanting continued access to the images, according to the NJOV study:

Sexual interest in children.
Sexual curiosity.
Sex addictions or sexual gratification.
Desire to relive adolescent fantasies.
Desire for power or control.

Clint Davis, a certified sex addiction therapist in Shreveport, said not all sex addicts or adults who view adult pornography will go on to view child sexual abuse images or molest children.

“Everyone who views pornography as an adult, or is a sex addict, does not view children in sexually explicit ways or find them attractive,” Davis said. “There is something cognitively different and broken about someone who views child sexual abuse. We’re not wired to view children that way.”

The David Wade Correctional Facility in Homer, Louisiana, is a sprawling state penitentiary with imposing gray walls and barbed wire fencing.

Most inmates within the compound serve long sentences – from decades to life. But the staff, programming and institution itself are based at least in part around the hope that inmates will lead productive lives, without re-offending, after their release. Staff said they are committed to helping the inmates, and the prison has elements of a rehabilitative environment such as ornamental gardens, a koi pond and chapel.

The facility’s sex offender treatment program is a voluntary program that involves five phases. Tucker, the assistant warden who works with the sex offender treatment program, said it has a 20-year history of success. Only 4.5 percent of sex offenders who complete the minimum year-long program will recidivate, or re-offend, after they return to their communities, Tucker said.

The program takes a risk-management approach to rehabilitation. In the initial phases, inmates are taught to identify “high-risk situations” where they might have an opportunity to victimize additional children, Tucker said.

A major part of the program is building individualized offender “profiles,” with psycho-educational treatment options tailored to offenders’ distorted thought patterns, which Tucker termed “cognitive distortions.”

An example of this distorted thinking: An offender who told Tucker that his 6-year-old victim had tried to initiate sex with him.

“That’s what we focus on, the thinking," Tucker said. "How did you come to be thinking that it’s okay to have sex with a child?”

Warden Jerry Goodwin said another type of cognitive distortion he sees frequently is “minimizing.”

“They’ll try to minimize the impact upon the victim. They may tell you their victim was a 14-year-old, a teenager, when in fact it was a 5- or 6-year-old child,” Goodwin said.

Another frequent cognitive distortion is an offender’s misinterpretation of a child’s physical arousal as consent, said Andres Hernandez, a private-practice psychologist who formerly directed the federal sex offender treatment program in Butner, North Carolina.

“Abuse doesn't cease to be abuse if the teenage boy, for example, has an erection or if the girl appears to have an orgasm when they perform oral sex on her,” Hernandez said.

Hernandez added that offenders often develop this cognitive distortion because they themselves were victims of sexual abuse as children.

“They have grown up believing that if this occurred to me, and I didn't turn out so bad or I actually enjoyed the sex with my abuser, then society must be wrong,” Hernandez said.

Tucker said events from offenders’ pasts may make them more likely to re-offend, such as a previous criminal background, a history of violence, a past crime committed against a stranger and inability to maintain intimate adult relationships.

A partnership with probation and parole offices is critical to the program’s overall success, Tucker said.

“I would like to see more split sentences where they are on supervision and treatment is mandatory on the street,” she said. “That would be more helpful.”

Goodwin said most offenders in the David Wade Correctional Facility who committed contact sex crimes against children assaulted their child victim through what he called “crimes of opportunity.”

“The majority of these sexual offenders in prison are not the violent, sexual predator type. They take advantage of certain opportunities,” Goodwin said. “If they’re not allowed to babysit their grandchildren anymore, then they are not going to go out and seek a victim. They generally victimize people that come to them.”

Goodwin described these offenders as “the most treatable” of sex offenders. But Hernandez cautioned that even opportunistic offenders can victimize more than one child.

“The story that is not told is that sometimes you have individuals who are serial relational offenders,” Hernandez said. “They move from one relationship to the other and they offend in various relationships.

Tucker said sex offenders who accessed child sexual abuse images on the internet face exponentially more “opportunities” to re-offend. She called the accessibility of materials on the internet “scary.”

There are lots of peer-to-peer networks out there that are very violent, full of violence and abuse towards children as well as adults,” she said. “You can look at anything and connect with other people who do the same things.

Much like those who commit sex crimes against children, those convicted of internet-related crimes often have conditions of release. Conditions often include no access to a computer or the internet without written permission from probation officers, including computer or internet-access while at work.

Prosecutors and law enforcement officials surveyed by The Times who supported sex offender registration cited public safety. Removing “opportunities” doesn’t necessarily remove the desire to re-offend, said Welch, the Louisiana State Police detective.

“Just because you take them away doesn’t mean (they) don’t want them anymore,” she said. “Just because you take it away doesn’t mean you’ve flipped the switch and that they don’t still desire that.”

Critics said registration makes reintegration, including finding stable housing and employment, more difficult for sex offenders. Drew Kingston, a clinical and forensic psychologist at the University of Ottawa in Canada, said specific requirements can counter-productively make offenders more likely to re-offend.

“These include, for example, publicly accessible offender registries and residency restrictions,” Kingston wrote in an email. “Thus far, these approaches have simply increased offenders’ risk to harm others because of the challenges it places before them for an overall successful reintegration.”

Solutions to rehabilitating sex offenders nationwide have ranged from the cognitive behavioral therapy and medication used at the Louisiana Department of Corrections to physical and chemical castration.

Castration doesn't work well on offenders who use sex for power or control rather than sexual gratification, Tucker said. In Louisiana, physical castration also is strictly voluntary, and judges often leave the choice of chemical castration up to the offenders.

“We offer it,” Goodwin said, referring to chemical castration.  “It’s not a popular program.”

What offenders watch

91        percent accessed child sexual abuse materials from home computers.

83        percent of images included pre-pubescent children.

80        percent had images depicting graphic sexual penetration of a child.

51       percent who blackmailed children with images wanted more images.

27        percent had organized collections of child sexual abuse materials.

26         percent who blackmailed children with images wanted to meet the child in person.

20        percent used “sophisticated” technology to cover their tracks.

14        percent had more than 1,000 child sexual abuse materials.

7          percent who blackmailed children with images wanted to money from the child.

Sources: National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, EPCAT report to Congress (2004), National Juvenile Online Victimization study

Child sexual abusers: Can they be fixed? Lex Talamo

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